The New Danger (Action Comics #1001 Comic Review)

Action Comics #1001: Invisible Mafia

Written by: Brian Michael Bendis

Art by: Patrick Gleason

Colors by: Alejandro Sanchez

Cover by: Gleason, Brad Anderson, Francis Manapul

 

 

The Large Picture

Action Comics aims to focus on the core dealings and interactions of the news folk at the Daily Planet, which is struggling to stay afloat. Coming off the heels of a near-extinction-level-event, the destruction of Kandor and all its citizens, a revelation from a new threat, Rogol Zaar that he intentionally destroyed Krypton, and Lois and Jon exploring outer-space with Jor-El, the Man of Tomorrow is heading toward a new chapter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Run-Down

This issue opens with Clark recounting his story to Perry, Jimmy, Robin, and Trish of Superman casually disarming, detaining, and even conversing with two thieves who attempt to take Lex Luthor’s safe from the rooftop of LexCorp Tower. Clark learns from Robin that a kid, Darryl Conners, identified Superman as the arsonist to Deputy Fire Chief Mallory Moore. Clark follows up on the lead and tracks Darryl to the bleachers of a school football stadium. It turns out that he was paid by “some guy, some big bald dude.” Clark checks the criminal database (which for some reason includes images that resemble DC publisher Dan Didio and series author Brian Michael Bendis). Clark dons the cape for a mid-afternoon flight, someone watches him from deep beneath the streets of Metropolis. Who are they? Why are they so obsessed with Supes? Who is REALLY lighting Metropolis on fire?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Plot of The Panel

You can always count on Bendis to use fast-paced dialogue and language that ranges from “poetic” to “confusing.” Bendis delivers what he’s well-known for. Since his DC debut in Action Comics 1000, Bendis has launched an all-out blitzkrieg of new characters, along with a string of (at times) incoherent plot points, and dialogue that tends to be more confusing than poetic. However, I was surprised in this issue at the heightened coherence of the plot and the overall narrative flow. The dialogue is still more confusing and at times distracting than it is clear. But this issue is a step in the right direction. The overall story seems flat, however.

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Shoot The Breeze Staff Writer

Shoot The Breeze Staff Writer

This account is an archive of all of the hard work and writings of our previous Staff Writers and Contributors on both Shoot The Breeze Comics when it previously existed as well as On Comics Ground, our current platform.
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Summary
There have been plenty of persistent disconnects throughout Bendis’ tenure as the Scribe of Steel, some of which carry-over into the new Action Comics, DC’s flagship title. However, the narrative flow of this issue is much tighter and more coherent. Readers and fans are introduced to a new chapter in Superman’s on-going Action Comics saga.
Good
  • Strong visual-textual cohesion
  • Narrative flow and coherence is more developed than before
  • Detailed artwork and imagery
  • Clean panel layouts
Bad
  • Weak dialogue
  • Story arc villains seem too contrived
7
Good
Art - 8
Character Development evelopment - 6
Cohesion - 9
Creativity of Story - 7
Accessibility for New Readers - 8
Dialogue - 4
This account is an archive of all of the hard work and writings of our previous Staff Writers and Contributors on both Shoot The Breeze Comics when it previously existed as well as On Comics Ground, our current platform.

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