Cool Surrealist Fantasy…but Where’s Wonder Woman? (Wonder Woman #63 Comic Review)

G. Willow Wilson – Writer
Emanuela Lupacchino – Pencils
Ray McCarthy – Inks
Romulo Fajardo Jr. – Colors
Pat Brosseau – Letterer
Xermanico – Cover
Kamone Shirahama – Variant Cover
Dave Wielgosz – Assistant Editor
Chris Conroy – Editor
Jamie S. Rich – Group Editor
William Moulton Marston – Creator of Wonder Woman

Three Olympians are in exile. Wonder Woman has dropped them off in the United States immigration services in hopes they might find a new home in America. Only problem? They don’t fit in. Now, a satyr, a minotaur, and a Pegasus are forced to find their place in the wild urban jungle of America.

Wonder Woman #63 has a very obvious political message. From the cover alone, readers can tell this issue criticizes prejudices toward American immigrants. Despite Xermanico’s provocative cover, G. Willow Wilson’s story never becomes a grim. Wilson opts instead for a surreal comedy featuring creatures from out of our wildest fantasies.

The three leads from this story are charming but more memorable for their designs than anything else. Emanuela Lupacchino, Ray McCarthy, and Romulo Fajardo Jr. do a superb job bringing these three fantastic creatures to life. A particular highlight is a scene in an upscale restaurant where all three are huddled in a booth, which, beyond just highlighting how these characters do not fit into a world not built for them, manages to capture each of their personalities in a succinct, effective matter.

While this issue of Wonder Woman makes for a terrific standalone story, there remains one issue: no Wonder Woman. For those coming to the issue to follow the continued adventures of Diana of Themyscira, prepare for disappointment. She appears in less than four panels.

As a satirical fantasy story, however, it works surprisingly well. The choice to opt for a humorous perspective on the otherwise controversial case of American xenophobia works well here, as it allows the reader to engage in the story without necessarily triggering audiences on either end of the political spectrum. It’s safe satire. Good for a laugh, but it won’t change anyone’s mind.

For those invested in Diana’s story, this may feel inconsequential, beyond the teaser at the end.

Wonder Woman #63 is a terrific picture of the immigrant experience told via surrealist fantasy in under twenty pages. What it isn’t, however, is a satisfying story about Wonder Woman.

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Shoot The Breeze Staff Writer

Shoot The Breeze Staff Writer

This account is an archive of all of the hard work and writings of our previous Staff Writers and Contributors on both Shoot The Breeze Comics when it previously existed as well as On Comics Ground, our current platform.
Summary
Wonder Woman #63 is a terrific picture of the immigrant experience told via surrealist fantasy in under twenty pages. What it isn't, however, is a satisfying story about Wonder Woman.
Good
  • Surreal fantasy humor
  • Political Satire
  • Amazing Art
Bad
  • Little Wonder Woman
  • Maybe Too Safe
  • Seems Inconsequential
7.7
Good
This account is an archive of all of the hard work and writings of our previous Staff Writers and Contributors on both Shoot The Breeze Comics when it previously existed as well as On Comics Ground, our current platform.

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