Step right up, ladies and gentlemen! (Show’s End #1 Pre-Review, no spoilers!)

Written by Anthony Cleveland

Art & Cover by Jeff Sadzinski

Color & Cover by Julian Gonzalez

Letters by Justin Birch

Edited by Giovanna T. Orozco, Chris Fernandez, & Brian Hawkins

Logo Design by Miguel Angel Zapata

Book Design by Andrew S. Zea

Coming in August from Mad Cave Studios, Show’s End, a supernatural drama set in late 1920s Georgia, is the story of twelve-year-old Loralye, a runaway with a secret.

In This Issue: Daxton Rickles’ World Famous Circus of Oddities and Curiosities is something of a safe haven for society’s outcasts. Loralye encounters them by accident late one night and is enchanted by the lights and the noise, but Rickles is concerned that the girl is to much of a “norm” to stay with the show. The fortune teller, Vaddy, is able to see something in Loralye—something Loralye doens’t even understand herself—and convinces Rickles to let her stay.

Little do they know that Loralye’s sweet exterior hides something more outlandish and wild than anything they’ve ever encountered, and it will change their hodge-podge family of misfits in a way no one could ever have foreseen.

My Two Cents: There’s no questioning why Anthony Cleveland and Jeff Sadzinski were selected winners in the 2018 Mad Cave Studios Talent Search. Cleveland has created a solid narrative with intriguing characters and just enough historical foundation to ground the reader in the familiar but also allow them to lean into the supernatural elements of the story. Sadzinski’s art has a visual depth which keeps you looking for what lurks in the shadows while still drawing the eye immediately to the intended focal point of the panel. Show’s End has the makings of a great story, and it should be a fun series to follow.

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Elizabeth Fazzio
South Bay native turned East Bay resident. Holder of two less-than-useful arts degrees. Human Resources professional by day, creative recluse the rest of the time. Favorite words: Weasel, toast. Mental health advocate--https://makeitok.org
Elizabeth Fazzio
Summary
Show's End is a 'what-if' adventure into the world of the circus freak show of the 1920s, but this version goes beyond conjoined twins and the bearded lady. I'm going to forecast high levels of found-family camaraderie and a fantastical exploration of the fear of the 'other'. Between our human tendency to seek excitement though anything labeled 'outlandish' while at the same time recoiling from it, there are a multitude of avenues open to Show's End to shine a light on that particular behavioral dichotomy. Just how that will be accomplished remains to be seen, but whichever way this creative team spins it, the path is shaping up to be suspenseful and enjoyable and likely very much human in its journey.
Good
  • Art and story blend seamlessly
  • Layered storytelling
  • Creative license with historical accuracy
Bad
  • There's the potential to err too far to the side of stereotype--we'll have to see if that happens or not.
8
Great
Art - 8
Story - 8
Writing - 8
Predictability - 8
Written by
South Bay native turned East Bay resident. Holder of two less-than-useful arts degrees. Human Resources professional by day, creative recluse the rest of the time. Favorite words: Weasel, toast. Mental health advocate--https://makeitok.org

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