We’re Going On A Wolf Hunt (Once & Future #2 Comic Review)

Written by Kieron Gillen

Illustrated by Dan Mora

Colored by Tamra Bonvillain

Lettered by Ed Dukeshire

Cover by Dan Mora

Forbidden Planet & Jetpack Comics Exclusive Variant Cover by David Lafuente

Forbidden Planet & Jetpack Comics Exclusive Variant Cover Colors by Germán García

Edited by Matt Gagnon

Associate Editor Amanda LaFranco

Design by Scott Newman

“Takes a certain sort to go wandering into the woods. Looking for wolves.”

In This Issue: Duncan is very confused, and who can blame him? He’s gone from a thoroughly tragic date to fighting the mythical Questing Beast, there’s a group of people on a mission to resurrect King Arthur and his gran turns out to be an ex-monster hunter and currently has a gun to his head and is making him drive her to Glastonbury to try to stop them.

It’s a lot to take in.

Once at Glastonbury, Bridgette and Duncan enter the remains of St. Michael’s church on Glastonbury Tor, which houses an entrance to a passageway leading to the final resting place of the mythical king, guarded by the spirits of the Ladies of the Lake. (Cue more gawping by Duncan.) As they sneak into the shadows of the lower chamber, Bridgette realizes it’s already too late. Their targets have already replaced the scabbard around Arthur’s long-buried skeleton and he is in the process of re-animating. Our heroes wait in the shadows and watch as Arthur determines (rather violently) that only the red-haired woman in the group—Elaine, the one who masterminded the theft of the scabbard—is of pure enough blood to be left alive. It turns out that Elaine has more than blood to offer, however. Bridgette says that Elaine should know better, leading Duncan to inquire just how Bridgette knows Elaine in the first place. The answer is simple; they used to work together.

My Two Cents: Issue #2 of Once & Future continues fast on the dazzling heels of the first. Writing and art play on each other beautifully, giving the reader a complete package of storytelling. Gillen’s dialogue is smooth and concise—it’s enough to keep the flow of the narrative, but not so much that it takes over in places where the art can ‘do the talking’. Bonvillain’s color is lush throughout, adding to and enhancing the overall feel of the book. The characterization is dynamic and compelling—we haven’t spent a ton of time with these characters yet, but we already have a solid feel of their personalities and how they’re going to contribute to the story. The team has woven known Arthurian legend into the narrative in a cogent manner, drawing on well-known lore and true history to tie Once & Future together.

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Elizabeth Fazzio
South Bay native turned East Bay resident. Holder of two less-than-useful arts degrees. Human Resources professional by day, creative recluse the rest of the time. Favorite words: Weasel, toast. Mental health advocate--https://makeitok.org
Elizabeth Fazzio
Summary
I'm just going to go ahead and out myself as a former Arthurian legend addict right now. I carried my copy of 'The Mists of Avalon' with me everywhere during middle school and read anything else I could get hold of on the subject. While my Camelot-obsessed days are very much behind me at this point, there remains in my cluttered noggin a veritable treasure trove of Avalon-centric knowledge, and its getting a revival thanks to 'Once & Future'. The team is doing a fabulous job of staying true to the source material while still giving their audience something new and exciting, which can be especially difficult when your chosen subject has been told and re-told an infinite number of times by as many sources. I'm enjoying the fact that I'm familiar with the locations and genealogy of Arthurian lore and am therefore able to prognosticate a bit about the possible plot lines this story may take, but if I wasn't in possession of this knowledge, I'm certain that I'd still be able to follow 'Once & Future' without any trouble whatsoever—and that is a trademark of good storytelling.
Good
  • Execution of magical realism
  • Art and story blend seamlessly
  • Story elements are balanced
  • Creative license with historical accuracy
Bad
  • This issue felt a bit short...
9
Amazing
Art - 9
Story - 9
Writing - 9
Predictability - 9
Written by
South Bay native turned East Bay resident. Holder of two less-than-useful arts degrees. Human Resources professional by day, creative recluse the rest of the time. Favorite words: Weasel, toast. Mental health advocate--https://makeitok.org

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