“Who can tell what’s waiting on the journey?” (Folklords #2 Comic Review)

Written by Matt Kindt

Illustrated by Matt Smith

Colored by Chris O’Halloran

Lettered by Jim Campbell

“We were one goat-curry pie from making an ally.”

In This Issue: Ansel and Archer are off on their way to find the legendary Folklore. Opting to take the more difficult path through the Enchanted Forest (because one never takes the easy path when one is on a quest), they meet with the traditional questing characters and obstacles. The first of these is a rather large and homely lady who Archer hits in the head with a rock. The boys flee from her, but she tosses Archer into a tree and kisses Ansel for some reason–they never do figure out why. Not long after, they come across a girl crying by a river. She claims to be lost in the forest, searching for her brother, who she fears has been taken by the Weeping Wood Killer. The boys offer to help her.

That night, all three of them fall asleep around the campfire.

Which is never a good idea.

My Two Cents: We’re on to the second leg of Ye Olde Hero’s Journey with Folklords this month. The story continues to flow as expected; taking the more difficult path, encountering strange and wonderful beings, a damsel in distress, making the fatal mistake of falling asleep without posting a guard. The story is progressing in the manner in which you’d expect any traditional fairy tale to advance, and though the specifics of the story are unique to Folklore, the plot is following a very familiar path. On the artistic front, Folklords is significantly less run-of-the-mill. Issue #2 has none of the moments of awkwardness that were present in Issue #1 insofar as instances of uncoordinated speech-to-action. We were also made aware of some of Archer’s backstory in this issue, which will likely prove to be important somewhere down the line, so we are starting to see a bit more ‘fleshing out’ of the characters, and that always provides for a more well-rounded story.

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Elizabeth Fazzio
South Bay native turned East Bay resident. Holder of two less-than-useful arts degrees. Human Resources professional by day, creative recluse the rest of the time. Favorite words: Weasel, toast. Mental health advocate--https://makeitok.org
Elizabeth Fazzio
Summary
I have conflicting feelings about Folklords. On one hand, it is following a long-used format, and is therefore rather predictable and familiar. On the other, as a devotee of the musical Into the Woods by Stephen Sondheim, I always appreciate a re-weaving of the stories we all know. Then again, this re-weaving has yet to turn anything on its head and thereby prove itself to be unique within the confines of the trope--though I may be proven wrong yet. We still have three issues in this arc.
Good
  • Art and story blend seamlessly
  • Story elements are balanced
Bad
  • Story is a bit predictable
7.5
Good
Art - 9
Story - 7
Writing - 7
Predictability - 7
Written by
South Bay native turned East Bay resident. Holder of two less-than-useful arts degrees. Human Resources professional by day, creative recluse the rest of the time. Favorite words: Weasel, toast. Mental health advocate--https://makeitok.org

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