She is Not an Angel (Bitter Root #7 Comic Review)

Bitter Root #7

Rage and Redemption Part Two

 

Created by: David F. Walker, Chuck Brown, & Sanford Greene

Color Artist: Sofie Dodgson

Lettered by: Clayton Cowles

Cover Artist: Sanford Greene

Variant Cover Artists: Chris Brunner & Rico Renzi

Backmatter: John Jennings

Previously on Bitter Root…

It seems like things are looking up as the Sangeyre family has seemingly defeated Dr. Sylvester in his mutated form. This victory comes after the return of Cullen and Aunt Nora from Barzakh, that

Berg suffering from the sickness

Poor Berg…

mysterious realm between Hell and Earth. The battle is hard-fought but there appears to be more to Dr. Sylvester and a new enemy emerges calling herself Adro. 

My Take

We take a trip to Boley, Oklahoma to see things from Dr. Sylvester’s perspective. We start in the Boley Community Baptist Church after he’s lost his wife. So even before Red Summer where he experiences immense loss, we learn about how he was dealing with the loss of his wife. Unfortunately, he tries to move on for a fresh start and that doesn’t go well either. As well, we learn about what drives the creatures who are not the more traditional jinoo that the Sangeyre deal with. The audience learns from Sylvester’s narration and the family learns from Berg and his continued affliction. We are also introduced to some new characters from the Sangerye family in the flashback, who are mighty interesting.

The art is breathtaking. The color is perfectly executed to represent the different moods, places, and transitions. My favorite page is with the purple tint beneath the city where all the bodies were found. The creators’ story reveals and also leaves you wanting more. The suspense is killing me but at once, I do not feel poorly informed. I love the idea that misery and pain can feel good but can lead to misguided action. Adro is the perfect representation of that. Additionally, I again appreciate the scholars in the back providing us with some academic reflection on some of the tropes in the book like healing from genetic trauma and the use of “conjuring” to resist injustice. As a package, I am never disappointed in what this trio of Walker, Brown, and Greene serve up. Pure genius.

The Sangerye family in purple beneath the city

Beneath the city

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Aaron Jones

Aaron Jones

Staff Writer
I do a few reviews (Black Panther) and I do news. I am a fan of both Marvel and DC heroes, Black Panther, Superman, Batman, The X-Men, Watchmen, to name a few. I also am streamer of a high degree, Netflix, Hulu plus, HBO, & Prime Video occupy a lot of my time when I'm not trying to save world in Education.
Summary
This issue reveals more of the tragic backstory of Dr. Sylvester and his family in Oklahoma. More understanding of the “non-Jinoo” and the origin of their state of being thanks to some flashbacks and Berg’s intuitions. The battle continues and from the way things look, it’s going to go down soon in Atlanta. Check out what happens next with our new villain Adro, Dr. Sylvester, and the pains of domestic terrorism.
Good
  • The colors pop and evoke some deep meanings
  • Back story is always welcome, wanted, and appreciated
  • Adro is about to bring the pain, literally
9.8
Amazing
Art - 10
Writing - 9
Plot - 10
Character development - 10
Fluidity from previous issue - 10
Written by
I do a few reviews (Black Panther) and I do news. I am a fan of both Marvel and DC heroes, Black Panther, Superman, Batman, The X-Men, Watchmen, to name a few. I also am streamer of a high degree, Netflix, Hulu plus, HBO, & Prime Video occupy a lot of my time when I'm not trying to save world in Education.

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