“I’ve Come to Talk With You Again.” (Shadecraft #2 Review)

Writer – Joe Henderson

Art and Cover – Lee Garbett

Color – Antonio Fabela

Letters – Simon Bowland

Editor – Rick Lopez Jr.

 

Previously on Shadecraft

 

We are introduced to Zadie Chu, a young woman dealing with all the typical teenage struggles: family pressures, school bullies, one-sided crushes, and terrifying shadowy nightmare creatures.

This time on Shadecraft

 

Zadie has apparently started channeling the spirit of her currently comatose brother through her shadow, a fact that might be related to the event that put him in a coma in the first place. She also deals with a new guidance counselor at the school who is not who she seems to be and the bullies return with what seems to be an apology at first glance but is quickly revealed to be another attempt at going viral after their initial bullying attempt landed them contentious comments online. Zadie also begins patching things up with the friend she was crushing on.

My thoughts on Shadecraft

You may recall I said I was lukewarm after the first episode, saying that the characters felt a little shallow and it seemed like the shadows were a generic metaphor for grief and coming of age. I am delighted to say that I am warming up to this series quite a bit as I’m spending more time with Zadie and her brother and I’m rather intrigued by the mystery it seems to be building. I don’t wish to spoil the twist at the end of this issue, but it’s apparent that there’s more to the shadows than Zadie is aware of and I am excited to see what that really means. The art is still very good with the shadow form of her brother still having that tantalizing uncanniness that the shadow creatures did in the first issue. Of course, he is more humanoid in appearance, creating a clear distinction between him and the creatures she previously dealt with, and I’m incredibly curious to see what else they do. I do still feel like the characters are somewhat typical for a story about teenagers, but as long as they aren’t boring, they can’t be bad and the chemistry between Zadie and her brother is rather touching.

The Good

  • The art is great with the design of Zadie’s brother particularly worth mentioning.
  • The characters are acquiring depth as the story does, making the journey feel very personal.
  • The mystery shows great promise.

 

The Bad

  • The characters still seem kind of generic.
  • The other human characters in the story, like Zadie’s friends at school, could use some attention.

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Avalon Willowbloom

Avalon Willowbloom

Avalon is a mother and nerd in about equal measure with special emphasis on post apocalypse settings and SciFi/Fantasy crossover genres. She aspires to be either a world famous voice actor or an infamous cryptid, whichever comes first.

Review

76%

Summary What seemed to be starting in issue one as a basic “Shadows = Grief” metaphor is shaping into a rather interesting mystery with charming and engaging, if somewhat generic, characters. Can’t wait to see what happens next!

Art
80%
Story
80%
Characters
70%

About The Author

Avalon Willowbloom

Avalon is a mother and nerd in about equal measure with special emphasis on post apocalypse settings and SciFi/Fantasy crossover genres. She aspires to be either a world famous voice actor or an infamous cryptid, whichever comes first.